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Follow-up samples negative for West Nile

City, Health District hopeful that cooler temps help knock down mosquito population

Post Date:10/22/2018 1:00 pm

UPDATE 10/22/18:

A follow-up sampling of mosquitoes taken at an expanded trapping site near brush and a collection pond behind H-E-B Center at (2114 Avenue of the Stars) has now tested negative for West Nile virus.  The Health District and City are hopeful that continued cool temperatures are helping to kill some of the weaker mosquitoes and help reduce the mosquito population. 

This testing is part of the City of Cedar Park’s proactive participation in the Williamson County and Cities Health District’s mosquito management program.  The results were indicated in a lab test at the Texas Department of State Health Services lab in Austin.  The City has been diligently working to drain and treat standing water from this week’s rainfall.  Mosquitoes cannot breed without standing water.   The City thanks residents for their hard work in draining and treating standing water at their own homes.  However, the City and Health District strongly encourage everyone to remain vigilant about protecting themselves from mosquito bites and preventing mosquito breeding on their personal property – especially considering last week’s rainfall and the rainfall that is forecasted for this week.

There are currently no reported human cases of West Nile Virus in Cedar Park.  Williamson County has seen no reported human cases since 2016.  West Nile Virus should not be confused with other mosquito-borne viruses.  For more information about West Nile Virus visit www.wcchd.org or www.txwestnile.org.

The Health District has four traps it uses on a regular basis, to capture mosquitoes at specific locations throughout Cedar Park.  The species that has tested positive is Culex quinquefasciatus (southern house mosquito).  This species has a flight range of about one mile.  Any time there is a positive West Nile virus test result, the Health District does expanded trapping at ten additional locations.  If testing from expanded trapping yields a negative result, trapping returns to regular and not expanded operations.   Because of this negative follow-up result the Health District has resumed normal trapping operations. 

 

Sample taken

Result date

WNV test result

Trap location area

Trap type

10/18/18

10/22/18

Negative

Area near Avenue of the Stars/New Hope Drive

Expanded

10/11/18

10/17/18

Positive

Avenue of the Stars/collection pond behind H-E-B Center

Regular

10/11/18

10/17/18

Negative

Brushy Creek Rd./Parmer Lane

Expanded

10/4/18

10/10/18

Positive

Brushy Creek Road/Parmer Lane

Regular

10/4/18

10/10/18

Negative

Cypress Creek/Lakeline

Expanded

9/27/18

10/2/18

Positive

Cypress Creek/Sun Chase

Regular

9/18/18

9/25/18

Negative

Cypress Creek/Lakeline

Expanded

9/13/18

9/18/18

Positive

Cypress Creek/Lakeline

Expanded

9/6/18

9/11/18

Positive

Cypress Creek/Sun Chase

Regular

8/2/18

8/6/18

Positive

Cypress Creek/Sun Chase

Regular

 

The City has maintained a particular focus on draining and treating any standing water on City-owned property citywide, and continues to follow the Health District’s Best Practices for Integrated Vector Management (IVM) — which call for continued enhanced monitoring and testing and increased public outreach and education.  The City needs citizens’ continued help.  Because mosquitoes breed in standing water the City is imploring residents to continue draining or treating any standing water on their own property.  Residents may also report standing water on public or private property by using the CP Connect 2.0 app or www.cedarparktexas.gov/reportaproblem so that City crews may investigate and take appropriate action.  

 

What you can do

Mosquitoes breed in standing or stagnant water.  Eliminating places where mosquitoes can breed and reducing the chances of mosquito bites are the most effective lines of defense against exposure to West Nile Virus.  As part of its Fight the Bite campaign the Health District recommends the 3 Ds of mosquito safety. 

 

  • Drain standing water in flower pots, pet dishes or clogged gutters so mosquitoes don’t have a place to breed and treat water that can’t be drained,
  • Defend by using an EPA-approved insect repellent, and
  • Dress in long sleeves and pants when outdoors.

 

The City’s Parks and Recreation Department uses bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) larvicide tablets on public property (such as parks) to treat any standing water that cannot be drained.  Bt is a naturally-occurring bacteria that is harmless to people and most pets but it interrupts the reproduction cycle of mosquitoes. You can find Bt for home use at most “big box” hardware retailers.   

 

In addition, the City’s Code Enforcement Division is focusing its efforts on mosquito abatement throughout the community.  If you are aware of a location of stagnant water on public or private property, please report it to the City’s Code Enforcement Division via www.cedarparktexas.gov/ReportaProblem, the CPConnect 2.0 app on your mobile device or e-mail at code@cedarparktexas.gov.     

 

For more information on mosquito safety, please visit the Williamson County and Cities Health District’s website at   http://www.wcchd.org/services/disease_mgmt/fight_the_bite_-_williamson_county/index.php

 

10/18/18: 

A follow-up sampling of mosquitoes taken at an expanded trapping site in southeast Cedar Park near the intersection of Parmer Lane and Brushy Creek Road has tested negative for West Nile Virus.  However, a sampling of mosquitoes trapped in the area near brush and a collection pond behind H-E-B Center at (2114 Avenue of the Stars) has now tested positive for West Nile virus.  All of these samples were taken last week, prior to the cold weather snap.  The Health District and City are hopeful that this week’s cold front killed some of the weaker mosquitoes and reduced the overall numbers. 

This testing is part of the City of Cedar Park’s proactive participation in the Williamson County and Cities Health District’s mosquito management program.  The results were indicated in a lab test at the Texas Department of State Health Services lab in Austin.  The City has been diligently working to drain and treat standing water from this week’s rainfall.  Mosquitoes cannot breed without standing water.   The City thanks residents for their hard work in draining and treating standing water at their own homes.  However, the City and Health District strongly encourage everyone to remain vigilant about protecting themselves from mosquito bites and preventing mosquito breeding on their personal property – especially considering this week’s rainfall.

There are currently no reported human cases of West Nile Virus in Cedar Park.  Williamson County has seen no reported human cases since 2016.  West Nile Virus should not be confused with other mosquito-borne viruses.  For more information about West Nile Virus visit www.wcchd.org or www.txwestnile.org.

The Health District has four traps it uses on a regular basis, to capture mosquitoes at specific locations throughout Cedar Park.  The species that has tested positive is Culex quinquefasciatus (southern house mosquito).  This species has a flight range of about one mile.  Any time there is a positive West Nile virus test result, the Health District does expanded trapping at ten additional locations.  If testing from expanded trapping yields a negative result, trapping returns to regular and not expanded operations.   While trapping has returned to normal in the areas of southeast Cedar Park due to this latest negative follow-up result, the Health District is conducting expanded trapping in the area around H-E-B Center due to this new positive result in this area. 

 

Sample taken

Result date

WNV test result

Trap location area

Trap type

10/11/18

10/17/18

Positive

Avenue of the Stars/collection pond behind H-E-B Center

Regular

10/11/18

10/17/18

Negative

Brushy Creek Rd./Parmer Lane

Expanded

10/4/18

10/10/18

Positive

Brushy Creek Road/Parmer Lane

Regular

10/4/18

10/10/18

Negative

Cypress Creek/Lakeline

Expanded

9/27/18

10/2/18

Positive

Cypress Creek/Sun Chase

Regular

9/18/18

9/25/18

Negative

Cypress Creek/Lakeline

Expanded

9/13/18

9/18/18

Positive

Cypress Creek/Lakeline

Expanded

9/6/18

9/11/18

Positive

Cypress Creek/Sun Chase

Regular

8/2/18

8/6/18

Positive

Cypress Creek/Sun Chase

Regular

 

The City has maintained a particular focus on draining and treating any standing water on City-owned property citywide, and continues to follow the Health District’s Best Practices for Integrated Vector Management (IVM) — which call for continued enhanced monitoring and testing and increased public outreach and education.  The City needs citizens’ continued help.  Because mosquitoes breed in standing water the City is imploring residents to continue draining or treating any standing water on their own property.  Residents may also report standing water on public or private property by using the CP Connect 2.0 app or www.cedarparktexas.gov/reportaproblem so that City crews may investigate and take appropriate action.  

What you can do

Mosquitoes breed in standing or stagnant water.  Eliminating places where mosquitoes can breed and reducing the chances of mosquito bites are the most effective lines of defense against exposure to West Nile Virus.  As part of its Fight the Bite campaign the Health District recommends the 3 Ds of mosquito safety. 

  • Drain standing water in flower pots, pet dishes or clogged gutters so mosquitoes don’t have a place to breed and treat water that can’t be drained,
  • Defend by using an EPA-approved insect repellent, and
  • Dress in long sleeves and pants when outdoors.

The City’s Parks and Recreation Department uses bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) larvicide tablets on public property (such as parks) to treat any standing water that cannot be drained.  Bt is a naturally-occurring bacteria that is harmless to people and most pets but it interrupts the reproduction cycle of mosquitoes. You can find Bt for home use at most “big box” hardware retailers.   

In addition, the City’s Code Enforcement Division is focusing its efforts on mosquito abatement throughout the community.  If you are aware of a location of stagnant water on public or private property, please report it to the City’s Code Enforcement Division via www.cedarparktexas.gov/ReportaProblem, the CPConnect 2.0 app on your mobile device or e-mail at code@cedarparktexas.gov.     

For more information on mosquito safety, please visit the Williamson County and Cities Health District’s website at   http://www.wcchd.org/services/disease_mgmt/fight_the_bite_-_williamson_county/index.php

UPDATE 10/10/18: 

A follow-up sampling of mosquitoes taken at an expanded trapping site in southwest Cedar Park near the intersection of Lakeline Boulevard and Cypress Creek Road has tested negative for West Nile Virus.  However, a sampling of mosquitoes trapped in the area near Brushy Creek Road west of Parmer Lane has tested positive for West Nile virus.  The testing is part of the City of Cedar Park’s proactive participation in the Williamson County and Cities Health District’s mosquito management program.  The results were indicated in a lab test at the Texas Department of State Health Services lab in Austin.  The City has been diligently working to drain and treat standing water from this week’s rainfall.  Mosquitoes cannot breed without standing water.   The City thanks residents for their hard work in draining and treating standing water at their own homes.  However, the City and Health District strongly encourage everyone to remain vigilant about protecting themselves from mosquito bites and preventing mosquito breeding on their personal property – especially considering this week’s rainfall.

There are currently no reported human cases of West Nile Virus in Cedar Park.  Williamson County has seen no reported human cases since 2016.  West Nile Virus should not be confused with other mosquito-borne viruses.  For more information about West Nile Virus visit www.wcchd.org or www.txwestnile.org.

The Health District now has four traps it uses on a regular basis, to capture mosquitoes at specific locations throughout Cedar Park.  The species that has tested positive is Culex quinquefasciatus (southern house mosquito).  This species has a flight range of about one mile.  Any time there is a positive West Nile virus test result, the Health District does expanded trapping at ten additional locations.  If testing from expanded trapping yields a negative result, trapping returns to regular and not expanded operations.   While trapping has returned to normal in the area of southwest Cedar Park due to this latest negative follow-up result, the Health District is conducting expanded trapping in the area of Brushy Creek Road and Parmer Lane due to this new positive result in this area. 

Sample taken

Result date

WNV test result

Trap location area

Trap type

10/4/18

10/10/18

Positive

Brushy Creek Road/Parmer Lane

Regular

10/4/18

10/10/18

Negative

Cypress Creek/Lakeline

Expanded

9/27/18

10/2/18

Positive

Cypress Creek/Sun Chase

Regular

9/18/18

9/25/18

Negative

Cypress Creek/Lakeline

Expanded

9/13/18

9/18/18

Positive

Cypress Creek/Lakeline

Expanded

9/6/18

9/11/18

Positive

Cypress Creek/Sun Chase

Regular

8/2/18

8/6/18

Positive

Cypress Creek/Sun Chase

Regular

 

The City has maintained a particular focus on draining and treating any standing water on City-owned property citywide, and continues to follow the Health District’s Best Practices for Integrated Vector Management (IVM) — which call for continued enhanced monitoring and testing and increased public outreach and education.  The City needs citizens’ continued help.  Because mosquitoes breed in standing water the City is imploring residents to continue draining or treating any standing water on their own property.  Residents may also report standing water on public or private property by using the CP Connect 2.0 app or www.cedarparktexas.gov/reportaproblem so that City crews may investigate and take appropriate action.  

What you can do

Mosquitoes breed in standing or stagnant water.  Eliminating places where mosquitoes can breed and reducing the chances of mosquito bites are the most effective lines of defense against exposure to West Nile Virus.  As part of its Fight the Bite campaign the Health District recommends the 3 Ds of mosquito safety. 

  • Drain standing water in flower pots, pet dishes or clogged gutters so mosquitoes don’t have a place to breed and treat water that can’t be drained,
  • Defend by using an EPA-approved insect repellent, and
  • Dress in long sleeves and pants when outdoors.

The City’s Parks and Recreation Department uses bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) larvicide tablets on public property (such as parks) to treat any standing water that cannot be drained.  Bt is a naturally-occurring bacteria that is harmless to people and most pets but it interrupts the reproduction cycle of mosquitoes. You can find Bt for home use at most “big box” hardware retailers.   

In addition, the City’s Code Enforcement Division is focusing its efforts on mosquito abatement throughout the community.  If you are aware of a location of stagnant water on public or private property, please report it to the City’s Code Enforcement Division via www.cedarparktexas.gov/ReportaProblem, the CPConnect 2.0 app on your mobile device or e-mail at code@cedarparktexas.gov.     

For more information on mosquito safety, please visit the Williamson County and Cities Health District’s website at   http://www.wcchd.org/services/disease_mgmt/fight_the_bite_-_williamson_county/index.php

UPDATE 10/3/18:

A new sampling of mosquitoes taken at a trapping site in Cedar Park has tested positive for West Nile Virus.  The testing is part of the City of Cedar Park’s proactive participation in the Williamson County and Cities Health District’s mosquito management program.  This negative test was indicated in a lab result from the Texas Department of State Health Services lab in Austin.  The City has been diligently working to drain and treat standing water to help prevent mosquito breeding and thanks residents for their hard work in draining and treating standing water at their own homes.  However, the City and Health District strongly encourage everyone to remain vigilant about protecting themselves from mosquito bites and preventing mosquito breeding on their personal property – especially considering recent rainfall.

There are currently no reported human cases of West Nile Virus in Cedar Park.  Williamson County has seen no reported human cases since 2016.  West Nile Virus should not be confused with other mosquito-borne viruses.  For more information about West Nile Virus visit www.wcchd.org or www.txwestnile.org.

The Health District has six traps it uses to regularly trap mosquitoes at various locations throughout Cedar Park.  The species that previously tested positive is Culex quinquefasciatus (southern house mosquito).  This species has a flight range of about one mile.  Any positive results so far this year have come from the area of southwest Cedar Park. Any time there is a positive West Nile virus test result, the Health District does expanded trapping at additional locations.  If testing from expanded trapping yields a negative result, trapping returns to regular and not expanded operations.  

Sample taken

Result date

WNV test result

Trap location area

Trap type

9/27/18

10/2/18

Positive

Cypress Creek/Sun Chase

Regular

9/18/18

9/25/18

Negative

Cypress Creek/Lakeline

Expanded

9/13/18

9/18/18

Positive

Cypress Creek/Lakeline

Expanded

9/6/18

9/11/18

Positive

Cypress Creek/Sun Chase

Regular

8/2/18

8/6/18

Positive

Cypress Creek/Sun Chase

Regular

 

The City has put a particular focus on draining and treating any standing water on City-owned property citywide, and continues to follow the Health District’s Best Practices for Integrated Vector Management (IVM) — which call for continued enhanced monitoring and testing and increased public outreach and education.  The City needs citizens’ continued help.  Because mosquitoes breed in standing water the City is imploring residents to continue draining or treating any standing water on their own property.  Residents may also report standing water on public or private property by using the CP Connect 2.0 app or www.cedarparktexas.gov/reportaproblem so that City crews may investigate and take appropriate action.  

What you can do

Mosquitoes breed in standing or stagnant water.  Eliminating places where mosquitoes can breed and reducing the chances of mosquito bites are the most effective lines of defense against exposure to West Nile Virus.  As part of its Fight the Bite campaign the Health District recommends the 3 Ds of mosquito safety. 

 

  • Drain standing water in flower pots, pet dishes or clogged gutters so mosquitoes don’t have a place to breed and treat water that can’t be drained,
  • Defend by using an EPA-approved insect repellent, and
  • Dress in long sleeves and pants when outdoors.

The City’s Parks and Recreation Department uses bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) larvicide tablets on public property (such as parks) to treat any standing water that cannot be drained.  Bt is a naturally-occurring bacteria that is harmless to people and most pets but it interrupts the reproduction cycle of mosquitoes. You can find Bt for home use at most “big box” hardware retailers.   

In addition, the City’s Code Enforcement Division is focusing its efforts on mosquito abatement throughout the community.  If you are aware of a location of stagnant water on public or private property, please report it to the City’s Code Enforcement Division via www.cedarparktexas.gov/ReportaProblem, the CPConnect 2.0 app on your mobile device or e-mail at code@cedarparktexas.gov.     

For more information on mosquito safety, please visit the Williamson County and Cities Health District’s website at   http://www.wcchd.org/services/disease_mgmt/fight_the_bite_-_williamson_county/index.php